Home » East-West Schism: Filioque, Mehmed II, Fourth Crusade, Fall of Constantinople, Pope Leo IX, Council of Florence, Basilios Bessarion by Books LLC
East-West Schism: Filioque, Mehmed II, Fourth Crusade, Fall of Constantinople, Pope Leo IX, Council of Florence, Basilios Bessarion Books LLC

East-West Schism: Filioque, Mehmed II, Fourth Crusade, Fall of Constantinople, Pope Leo IX, Council of Florence, Basilios Bessarion

Books LLC

Published September 4th 2011
ISBN : 9781157655695
Paperback
72 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 70. Chapters: Filioque, Mehmed II, Fourth Crusade, Fall of Constantinople, Pope Leo IX, Council of Florence,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 70. Chapters: Filioque, Mehmed II, Fourth Crusade, Fall of Constantinople, Pope Leo IX, Council of Florence, Basilios Bessarion, East-West Schism, Western Rite Orthodoxy, History of the East-West Schism, Petrine doctrine, Latin Patriarch of Constantinople, Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church, Michael I Cerularius, Mark of Ephesus, Contra Errores Graecorum, Council of Aachen, Council of Bari, Encyclical of the Eastern Patriarchs, Catholic-Orthodox Joint Declaration of 1965. Excerpt: The East-West Schism of 1054, sometimes known as the Great Schism, formally divided the State church of the Roman Empire into Eastern (Greek) and Western (Latin) branches, which later became known as the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church, respectively. Relations between East and West had long been embittered by political and ecclesiastical differences and theological disputes. Prominent among these were the issues of filioque, whether leavened or unleavened bread should be used in the Eucharist, the Popes claim to universal jurisdiction, and the place of Constantinople in relation to the Pentarchy. Pope Leo IX and Patriarch of Constantinople Michael Cerularius heightened the conflict by suppressing Greek and Latin in their respective domains. In 1054, Roman legates traveled to Cerularius to deny him the title Ecumenical Patriarch and to insist that he recognize the Church of Romes claim to be the head and mother of the churches. Cerularius refused. The leader of the Latin contingent, Cardinal Humbert, excommunicated Cerularius, while Cerularius in return excommunicated Cardinal Humbert and other legates. The validity of the Western legates act is doubtful, since Pope Leo had died, while Cerulariuss excommunication applied only to the legates personally. St...