Home » Letters of Queen Margaret of Anjou and Bishop Beckington and Others Volume 86 by Margaret Of Anjou
Letters of Queen Margaret of Anjou and Bishop Beckington and Others Volume 86 Margaret Of Anjou

Letters of Queen Margaret of Anjou and Bishop Beckington and Others Volume 86

Margaret Of Anjou

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230369594
Paperback
62 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ... part of the journal.MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ... part of the journal. They throw light, moreover, on the state of mind in which Beckington proceeded on his embassy, and show how little expectation he had of a favourable issue. They are curious also, as giving a glimpse of the mental characteristics of the writer. Letters 1 and 3, and perhaps 8, and the skeleton letter 17, were addressed to William de la Poleat that time Earl (subsequently Duke) of Suffolk. The Dukeof Suffolk was accused by the Commons in 1450 (inter alia) of having given private information to the King of France of this very embassy to Guicnne, thus preventing a match to which he is said to have been opposed. His banishment and murder at sea are well known to all readers of English history.b Ashm. M3S. No. 789. This U a very curious volume, the whole of which was written in the 15th century. It formerly belonged to Charles Boothe, who was bishop of Hereford from 1516 to 1535. He placed it in the office of his registrar, there to remain absque alienatione ejusdem- but how he became possessed of it, or how from him it came to the hands of Elias Ashmole, who bequeathed it with many other MSS. to Oxford, does not appear. Beckingtons Registrant Privatum begins at fo. 147, and ends at fo. 359. It is chiefly taken up with the journal of the embassy to Guienne, but it also contains letters to and from divers personages of rank, intermingled with common business forms. It has, in truth, much the appearance of a precedent or common-place book. Most of the letters, but not all of them, are in Latin. I am informed by my friend M. Francisque Michel that the part of the journal relating to Bordeaux was translated into French by M. Gustuve Brunet, and published among the Actes dc IAcadeniie Royale of that town. b...